Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Judiciary

It will soon be illegal in Seattle to discriminate against people for seeking or receiving an abortion, part of the city’s efforts to preserve reproductive rights locally. The Seattle Times reports the Seattle City Council on Tuesday passed a measure making it illegal to discriminate against someone based on their actual or perceived pregnancy outcome. The council also added a statewide misdemeanor charge for interfering with health care to the city’s code, hoping to minimize interference and harassment against those seeking care in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court undoing decades of constitutional abortion protections in June.

  • Updated

A federal judge in California has ruled three golfers who joined Saudi-backed LIV Golf will not be able to compete in the PGA Tour’s postseason. U.S. District Judge Beth Labson Freeman made her decision in San Jose after attorneys for the sides each spoke about an hour.The golfers were seeking a temporary restraining order, which Freeman denied. Talor Gooch, Matt Jones and Hudson Swafford claimed they should be able to play where they want to. They are among 10 players who filed an antitrust lawsuit against the PGA Tour last week — including Phil Mickelson.

  • Updated

For much of the year, small cracks in Donald Trump’s political support have been growing. But the FBI's search of the former president’s Florida estate has unified Republicans behind Trump as almost never before. By Tuesday, the day after the unprecedented search, the overwhelming majority of Republican officials were accusing the Biden administration of “weaponizing” the Justice Department. And for a day, at least, Republican concerns about Trump’s past behavior and political shortcomings were forgotten. The FBI search also triggered a shift among Trump’s advisers, who had been privately urging him to wait until after the midterm elections to announce another presidential run. Suddenly, they were urging him to launch his campaign now.

  • Updated

The city of Portland has accused the U.S. Department of Justice of stating incorrect information and misinterpreting police programs while negotiations continue about how to bring Portland back into compliance with a police use of force federal settlement agreement. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports city attorneys responded in July to the Justice Department’s sixth periodic assessment with a line-by-line rebuttal claiming the Justice Department is moving the goalposts or simply wrong. OPB obtained a copy of the rebuttal through a public records request. The Justice Department declined to comment.

  • Updated

A Nebraska woman has been charged with helping her teenage daughter have an abortion. The charges come after investigators uncovered Facebook messages in which the mother and daughter discussed using medication to end the approximately 24-week pregnancy. Nebraska law prohibits abortion after 20 weeks. Prosecutors charged 41-year-old Jessica Burgess with helping her then 17-year-old daughter end her pregnancy and then burning and burying the fetus. Madison County Attorney Joseph Smith says he's never had a case involving an illegal abortion in his 32 years as the prosecutor.

-U.S. Rep. Scott Perry says his cellphone was seized Tuesday by FBI agents carrying a search warrant. The circumstances surrounding the seizure were not immediately known. The Pennsylvania Republican says three agents visited him while he was traveling Tuesday with his family and “seized my cell phone.” Perry has been a figure in the congressional investigation into President Donald Trump’s actions leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol insurrection. Former senior Justice Department officials have testified Perry had “an important role” in Trump’s effort to try to install Jeffrey Clark — a top Justice official who was pushing Trump’s baseless claims of election fraud — as the acting attorney general.

  • Updated

A jury has been selected in the second trial of two men charged with conspiring to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer over their disgust with restrictions early in the COVID-19 pandemic. The judge and lawyers on Tuesday settled on 18 people, including six alternates, to hear the case against Adam Fox and Barry Croft Jr. A jury in April couldn’t reach a verdict on the two men. Two co-defendants were acquitted and two more pleaded guilty. Dozens of prospective jurors from western and northern Michigan reported to the federal courthouse in Grand Rapids. The government says the plot to kidnap the Democratic governor followed training in Wisconsin and Michigan and two trips to scout her second home in northern Michigan. Defense attorneys say Fox and Croft were entrapped.

  • Updated

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says he feels the league needed to keep pushing for a year-long suspension for Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson because of his “egregious” and “predatory behavior” toward women. Goodell was addressing the league’s decision to appeal a six-game suspension given to Watson by Sue L. Robinson, a former federal judge appointed by the NFL and NFL Players Association as an independent league disciplinary officer. Robinson found Watson violated the league’s conduct policy after he was accused by two dozen women of sexual assault or harassment while he played for Houston.

  • Updated

A judge has opened the door for a district attorney to try to prosecute someone for a 2020 campaign ad by North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein using a specific criminal count that Stein argues is unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagles refused on Tuesday to issue a preliminary injunction two weeks after she signed an emergency order blocking temporarily enforcement of the state law. Stein’s campaign committee was worried the Wake County district attorney’s office was taking the case to a grand jury last month. The law makes it a misdemeanor for someone to knowingly circulate false “derogatory” reports about candidates to damage their election chances.

A recent State Highway Patrol commander and the current Winston-Salem police chief will be among President Joe Biden’s nominees to serve as North Carolina’s U.S. marshals. Biden announced on Tuesday that retired patrol Col. Glenn McNeill is his choice to become marshal for the Eastern District of North Carolina, while the president said it’s his intent to nominate Winston-Salem Chief Catrina Thompson for the Middle District post. The nominee for the Western District will be Terry Burgin, a former Lincolnton police chief who is now the district’s security officer. These nominees are subject to Senate confirmation. Marshals’ duties include protecting federal judges, capturing fugitives and housing prisoners.

  • Updated

The U.S. Department of Justice asked a federal judge this week to bar Idaho from enforcing its near-total abortion ban while a lawsuit pitting federal health care law against state anti-abortion legislation is underway. The Idaho law is set to automatically take effect on Aug. 25. It makes it a crime for anyone to perform abortions, punishable by up to five years in prison. Physicians who are charged can defend themselves at trial by arguing that the abortions are necessary to save a patient's life or that they were performed because of rape or incest. Meanwhile, a Wyoming judge is considering whether to put that state's abortion ban on hold while another lawsuit moves forward.

  • Updated

News that FBI agents descended on former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home and searched it have spawned accusations of a politicized law enforcement organization doing the bidding of the Biden administration in targeting political enemies. The reality is that the process of obtaining a search warrant is a controlled by a checklist of requirements before a judge signs off on a decision to invade someone’s home. Experts say that even the decision to seek a warrant to search a former president’s property would probably have to have been approved by top officials at the Justice Department.

  • Updated

A judge says a Michigan city violated the U.S. Constitution by chalking tires to enforce parking limits. But Saginaw won’t be forced to refund thousands of tickets. Federal Judge Thomas Ludington said Monday that Saginaw must only pay vehicle owners a dollar for each marking. Ludington says the chalking was illegal but “relatively harmless.” Saginaw staff marked tires and subsequently wrote tickets if they returned to find a vehicle was parked too long. After five years of litigation, Ludington ruled in favor of Alison Taylor, who received 14 tickets. The judge says marking tires without a warrant violated constitutional protections against unreasonable searches.

  • Updated

Ahmaud Arbery is being honored by his hometown after stiff sentences for hate crimes against the white men who chased and killed him. Dozens of people joined Arbery's family on a sweltering street corner Tuesday as Brunswick city officials unveiled signs designating a 2.7-mile roadway as Honorary Ahmaud Arbery Street. Arbery was fatally shot Feb. 23, 2020, after being chased by three men in pickup trucks who wrongly suspected him of committing crimes. Father and son Greg and Travis McMichael were sentenced to life terms for hate crimes by a federal judge Monday. Their neighbor, William “Roddie” Bryan, got 35 years. All three had already received life sentences in a Georgia court for Arbery's murder.

A federal appeals court is siding with Congress in a fight over former President Donald Trump's tax returns. A three-judge appeals panel ruled Tuesday that Congress has broad authority to request Trump's tax records and that the Treasury Department should provide them. The House Ways and Means panel is seeking Trump’s tax returns as part of an investigation into the Internal Revenue Service’s audit program and tax law compliance. The committee said that it expects to receive the requested tax documents ”immediately.” It wasn’t immediately clear whether Trump would appeal the court's decision.

  • Updated

A judge said Tuesday that Rudy Giuliani must appear in Atlanta in person to testify before a special grand jury that’s investigating whether former President Donald Trump and others illegally tried to influence the 2020 election in Georgia and set his appearance for next week. Giuliani’s lawyers have argued that a recent medical procedure to place two heart stents has left him unable to travel by plane. Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis and her team have rejected Giuliani’s attorneys’ suggestions that he appear virtually or do an interview with prosecutors rather than appearing before the special grand jury. Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney set Giuliani’s appearance for Aug. 17.

  • Updated

The state of Georgia is asking a federal appeals court to put elections for public service commissioners back on the November ballot. The appeal came Monday after a federal judge last week found statewide election of Georgia’s five commissioners illegally dilutes Black votes. The state argues that the trial court judge was wrong in concluding that race and not Democratic partisanship drives defeat of candidates preferred by Black voters. The judge ruled Black-favored candidates would have a better chance if only voters in a district voted on candidates. The state asked the 11th Circuit to issue a stay by Friday. That would allow ballots with two commission elections to be printed.

  • Updated

Wildlife advocates are suing federal officials after they missed a deadline to decide if protections for wolves should be restored across the northern U.S. Rocky Mountains. Republican-led states in the region have made it easier to kill the predators. That's raised worries that wolf numbers could be reduced to unsustainable levels. The Biden administration said in a preliminary finding last September that protections for wolves may need to be restored. A final determination was due June 1. The Humane Society of the United States and Center for Biological Diversity on Tuesday asked a federal judge in Montana to order officials to make a decision.

The North Carolina attorney general’s office is asking a federal court not to restore the state's 20-week abortion ban after the judge suggested his previous injunction “may now be contrary to law.” The attorney general’s office argued in a brief filed late Monday that reinstating restrictions in the aftermath of the June U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade would create “significant risk of public confusion” about the availability and legality of abortion services in North Carolina. Staff attorneys in Stein’s office filed the brief without the attorney general’s involvement.

  • Updated

The Department of Homeland Security says it has ended a Trump-era policy requiring asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico for hearings in U.S. immigration court. The announcement Monday came hours after a judge lifted an order in effect since December that it be reinstated. The timing had been in doubt since the Supreme Court ruled on June 30 that the Biden administration could end the “Remain in Mexico” policy. Homeland Security officials were largely silent, saying they had to wait for the court to certify the ruling and for a Trump-appointed judge to then lift his injunction.

  • Updated

A federal appeals court has restored the death sentence of a bank robber convicted of killing his best friend, his friend's fiancée and their three children. In a 32-page opinion, a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday overturned a lower court ruling that would have freed Ronald Jeffery Prible Jr. if the state did not retry Prible within six months. The panel ruled Prible failed to raise issues sufficient to discredit his conviction and sentence. A Harris County jury condemned Prible in 2002 for killing Esteban "Steve″ Herrera; Herrera’s fiancée Nilda Tirado; and their children in 1999.

  • Updated

The white father and son convicted of murder in Ahmaud Arbery’s fatal shooting after they chased the 25-year-old Black man through a Georgia neighborhood have been sentenced to life in prison for committing a federal hate crime. A U.S. District Court judge sentenced Travis McMichael and his father Greg McMichael on Monday in Brunswick. Both were previously sentenced to life without parole in a state court for Arbery’s murder. The McMichaels armed themselves with guns and used a pickup truck to chase Arbery after he ran past their home on Feb. 23, 2020. Neighbor William “Roddie” Bryan, who recorded cellphone video of the slaying, was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

  • Updated

A judge is considering whether Georgia officials should once again be prohibited from enforcing the state’s restrictive abortion law while a legal challenge against it is pending. Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney heard arguments Monday from lawyers for the state and for doctors and advocacy groups who filed a lawsuit challenging the law. He said he needed to think about the issues but that he would issue a ruling soon. The hearing focused on whether the judge has the power to block the law temporarily while the litigation plays out and whether the law was invalid from the start because it violated the U.S. Constitution and U.S. Supreme Court precedent when it was enacted.

  • Updated

A lawyer for Rudy Giuliani says the former New York mayor will not appear as scheduled Tuesday before a special grand jury in Atlanta that’s investigating whether former President Donald Trump and others illegally tried to interfere in the 2020 general election in Georgia. A judge last month ordered Giuliani to appear before the special grand jury Tuesday. But Giuliani’s attorney, Robert Costello, told The Associated Press on Monday that the Fulton County judge overseeing the special grand jury had excused Giuliani for the day. Costello said a hearing will be held Tuesday if he and the district attorney’s office are unable to work out an agreement concerning Giuliani’s testimony.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert